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The legality of cannabis and similar drugs is tricky. In principle, it's not allowed to grow, harvester, sell, buy or store it. It is not however illegal to consume it, and courts have consistently ruled that consumption alone is not proof of any illegal activity to obtain it.

If you get caught having any drugs on you, that is illegal though, and you can be punished for it. However, if it is just a small amount for personal use (a so-called “geringe Menge”), generally no charges will be pressed, though ist may still be taken on record and may endanher your driving license (though I only ever hear this in cases of serial offenders).

The legal theory behind it is weird (in my opinion). The constitutional court had to rule whether the ban on cannabis products was constitutional, and argued that it was, as long as posession of small amounts for personal use is not prosecuted. But the current state ultimately still leaves the decision to prosecute or not up to the prosecution, as they have to decide if the prosecution is “in the public interest”

The tricky part is what constitutes a “Geringe Menge”. As the federal law does not specify this explicitly, it is left up to the states to tell their police force and prosecution what exactly that means, and therefore it can be different in each one. Currently you are reasonable safe if you carry less than five grams, most states draw the line a six.

The annual African Youth Education Awards (AYEA) took place on Saturday and was attended by more than 400 guests from across Germany. The event, which showcases the success of young people with African background in their educational endeavours, was attended by, among other dignitaries, the Mayor of Hamburg-Mitte, Falko Drossmann, and the ambassadors of Ghana and Nigeria to Germany, H.E Gina Ama Blay and H.E. Maitama Yusuf Tuggar, respectively.

AYEA, which took place for the eighth year this time, seeks to motivate and empower young people of African descent to perform well in school.

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H.E. Maitama Yusuf Tuggar of Nigerian presenting the AYEA Prize to Mubarik Wienhold
Ten students – Sadia Harriet De Kiden, Leah Ofori, Mubarik Wienhold, Chinemerem Abbott, Yasir Salami, Yanneck Sennah Beddy, Grace Jacob, Maher Tenin Doumbouya, Jasmin Schimankowitz and Oheneba Holst – were honoured with the AYEA 2018 for Academic Excellence and for being veritable role model for their peers in the African community.

In his opening speech, Edward Martin of TopAfric e.V. said education was important for the self-confidence of young people. He called on young Germans with African background to work together and support each other. They would by so doing motivate each other for greater excellence in their education or training endeavours. 

Martin also called for closer collaboration of community initiatives for synergy, which will enable them to better fulfil their objectives.
Ian Kara, Sri Lanka-born entrepreneur and former member of the Hamburg Senate, said education was responsible for the disparities in the development of African and Asian countries. He mentioned Singapore, whose success he attributed to its adoption of a superior educational model. That example, he argued, shows that education was not only important as a key to individual success but also to the success of nations.
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H.E Gina Ama Blay of Ghana presenting the AYEA Prize to Jasmin Schimankowitz

In his speech, Ambassador Tuggar of Nigeria, said education was essential to youth empowerment and nation building. He cited China as an example of a country’s that has succeeded due to its focus on the education of its youths.

Ambassador Blay also encouraged the youth to take their education seriously while Mayor Drossmann called for an increased African participation in the communal political process.

Motivation speaker and author Akuma Saningo said the future belongs to entrepreneurs, which demands that young people should start developing their skills from an early age. The author of Macht was draus posited that as a successful entrepreneur, people of African origin would not only be useful to themselves, but also to their countries of origin and Germany.

Dr Saningo also encouraged young Africans to cultivate the habit of reading, which enables them to better develop their potential. “Don’t accept any suggestion from anybody that there’s something you can’t do it,” he said, ending his moving speech.
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Falko Drossmann, Mayor of Hamburg -Mitte presenting the AYEA Prize to Yanneck Sennah Beddy

Other speakers at the one-day event emphasised education as a key to success in life and why young people should spare no efforts to succeed in school.

In his closing remarks, Desmond John Beddy, founder of the AYEA initiative, thanked the sponsors and the attendees for taking time to be at the event. The journalist and proprietor of TopAfric Media Network said the award was borne out of the conviction that education was the best path to success in life. In ending his speech and to wide applause, Beddy called on Africans with German citizenship not only to travel with their passport but also vote with it, encouraging them to exercise their voting rights.

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Honorary Consul of Mali -Hon. Bettina Rhensius-Krohn. An outstanding African consul in Germany

The AYEA was initiated in 2011 to act against the observed low educational attainment level of young Africans, which is partly attributable to lack of motivation.

Femi Awoniyi -/The African Courier

This is absolutely the best of times to talk about the African participation in slavery. This is absolutely the worst of times to talk about the African participation in slavery.

There is strong preference for uncomfortable truths about the matter to be kept out of sight. But this is a good time to undertake a disinterment.

The great early 20th-Century black writer of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston, bitterly complained that "the white people held my people in slavery here in America. They had bought us, it is true, and exploited us.

But the inescapable fact that stuck in my craw was: My people had sold me ... . My own people had exterminated whole nations and torn families apart for a profit before the strangers got their chance at a cut. It was a sobering thought. It impressed upon me the universal nature of greed." And we might add, the universal nature of slavery.

African kings were willing to provide a steady flow of captives, who they said were criminals or prisoners of war doomed for execution. Many were not, but this did not prevent traders posing as philanthropists who were rescuing the Africans from death and offering them a better and more productive life.

When France and Britain outlawed slavery in their territories in the early 19th Century, African chiefs who had grown rich and powerful off the slave trade sent protest delegations to Paris and London. Britain abolished the slave trade and slavery itself against fierce opposition from West African and Arab traders.

According to Basil Davidson, celebrated scholar of African history, in his book The African Slave Trade: "The notion that Europe altogether imposed the slave trade on Africa is without any foundation in history ... . Those Africans who were involved in the trade were seldom the helpless victims of a commerce they did not understand: On the contrary, they responded to its challenge. They exploited its opportunities."

Until the 18th Century, very few Europeans had any moral reservations about slavery, which contradicted no important social value for most people around the world. In the Arab world, which was the first to import large numbers of slaves from Africa, the slave traffic was cosmopolitan. Slaves of all types were sold in open bazaars. The Arabs played an important role as middlemen in the trans-atlantic slave trade, and research data suggest that between the 7th and the 19th centuries, they transported more than 14 million black slaves across the Sahara and the Red Sea, as many or more than were shipped to the Americas, depending on the estimates for the transatlantic slave trade.

Tunde Obadina, a director of Africa Business Information Services, has acknowledged the importance of Britain, and other Western countries, in ending the slave trade. "When Britain abolished the slave trade in 1807," he has written, "it not only had to contend with opposition from white slavers, but also from African rulers who had become accustomed to wealth gained from selling slaves or from taxes collected on slaves passed through their domain. African slave-trading classes were greatly distressed by the news that legislators sitting in Parliament in London had decided to end their source of livelihood. But for as long as there was demand from the Americas for slaves, the lucrative business continued."

"Slave trading for export," Obadina notes, only "ended in Nigeria and elsewhere in West Africa after slavery ended in the Spanish colonies of Brazil and Cuba in 1880. A consequence of the ending of the slave trade was the expansion of domestic slavery as African businessmen replaced trade in human chattel with increased export of primary commodities. Labour was needed to cultivate the new source of wealth for the African elites. The ending of the obnoxious business had nothing to do with events in Africa. Rulers and traders there would have happily continued to sell humans for as long as there was demand for them."

Mali only legally abolished slavery in 1960 and hundreds of thousands of people are still enslaved there in 2015, despite the law.

As Thomas Sowell, a black conservative American scholar, has pointed out the efforts of the European nations to wipe out slavery have been virtually ignored. "Incredibly late in human history", he writes, "a mass moral revulsion finally set in against slavery - first in 18th-century England, and then during the 19th Century, throughout Western civilisation. But only in Western civilisation ... Africans, Arabs, and Asians continued to resist giving up their slaves. Only because Western power was at its peak in the 19th Century was Western imperialism able to impose the abolition of slavery around the world - as it imposed the rest of its beliefs and agendas, for good or evil."

The resistance put up by Africans, Asians and Arabs was monumental in defence of slavery and lasted for more than a century, Sowell writes. Only the overwhelming military power of the West enabled it to prevail on this issue, and only the moral outrage of Western peoples kept their Government's feet to the fire politically to maintain the pressure against slavery around the world.

Ghanaian politician and educator Samuel Sulemana Fuseini has acknowledged that his Asante ancestors accumulated their great wealth by abducting, capturing, and kidnapping Africans and selling them as slaves.

Ghanaian diplomat Kofi Awoonor has also written: "I believe there is a great psychic shadow over Africa, and it has much to do with our guilt and denial of our role in the slave trade. We, too, are blameworthy in what was essentially one of the most heinous crimes in human history."

In 2000, at an observance attended by delegates from several European countries and the United States, officials from Benin publicised President Mathieu Kerekou's apology for his country's role in "selling fellow Africans by the millions to white slave traders".

"We cry for forgiveness and reconciliation," said Luc Gnacadja, Benin's minister of environment and housing.

Cyrille Oguin, Benin's ambassador to the United States, acknowledged: "We share in the responsibility for this terrible human tragedy."

A year later, the president of Senegal, Abdoulaye Wade, who is himself the descendant of generations of slave-owning and slave-trading African kings, urged Europeans, Americans, and Africans to acknowledge publicly and teach openly about their shared responsibility for the Atlantic slave trade. Wade's remarks came shortly after the release of "the first African film to look at African involvement in the slave trade with the West" by Ivory Coast director Roger Gnoan M'bala.

"It's up to us," M'Bala declared, "to talk about slavery, open the wounds of what we've always hidden and stop being puerile when we put responsibility on others ... ."

"In our own oral tradition, slavery is left out purposefully because Africans are ashamed when we confront slavery. Let's wake up and look at ourselves through our own image."

But African slaveholders and slave traders didn't think of themselves or their slaves as 'Africans'. Instead, they thought of themselves in tribal terms and their slaves as foreigners or inferiors.

What William Wilberforce and other abolitionists vanquished, one writer explains, was something even worse than slavery, something that was much more fundamental and could hardly be seen from where we stand today: They vanquished the very mindset that made slavery acceptable and allowed it to survive and thrive for millennia. They destroyed an entire way of seeing the world, one that had held sway from the beginning of history, and replaced it with another way of seeing the world.

Thomas Sowell notes that "the anti-slavery movement was spearheaded by people who would today be called "the religious Right" and its organisation was created by conservative businessmen. "Moreover, what destroyed slavery in the non-Western world was Western imperialism," he argues. "Nothing could be more jolting and discordant with the vision of today's intellectuals than the fact that it was businessmen, devout religious leaders and Western imperialists who together destroyed slavery around the world. And if it doesn't fit their vision, it is the same to them as if it never happened."

I am particularly indebted to the very politically incorrect work of Thomas Sowell and to Dinesh D'Souza's now famous 20-year old Policy Review essay, 'We the Slave Owners', for information on this horrible subject of slavery and African participation in it. But many other sources are freely available on the Web which I have tapped for this piece and which can be easily checked, if prejudice against these uncomfortable truths does not provoke a boycott.

- Martin Henry is a university administrator. Email feedback to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Am 13 Oktober 2018 finden wieder die alljährlichen African Youth Education Awards (AYE-Awards) in der Handelskammer-Hamburg statt.

Diese Veranstaltung ist zu einer Institution geworden und fest im Kalender vieler Politiker und Diplomaten eingeplant: die African Youth Education Awards (AYE-Awards).

Wie jedes Jahr werden junge Menschen mit afrikanischem Migrationshintergrund ausgezeichnet, die sich in Sachen Bildung bewiesen haben. Besonders wichtig und motivierend für die jungen Menschen ist die Tatsache, dass der Preis aus der Mitte der Community kommt. So erfahren sie die Anerkennung die es braucht um dem Thema Bildung in ihrem Leben einen höheren Stellenwert zu geben. Auch diese AYE-Awards werden von TopAfric e.V. organisiert, einem Verein, der als Anlaufstelle für Familien und deren Kindern in Sachen Bildung fungiert.

Falko Drossmann Bezirksamtleiter Hamburg –Mitte, H.E. Maitama Yusuf Tuggar, Botschafter der Republik Nigeria, I. E. Frau Gina Ama Blay, Botschafterin der Republik Ghana, H.E. Simplice Honoré GUIBILA, der Republik Burkina Faso, Hon. Bettina Rhensius-Krohn Honorar consul of Mali –Hamburg, Hon. Petra Hammelmann, Honorarkonsulin der Vereinigten Republik Tansania, Ian karan, Unternehmer und Ex-Wirtschaftssenator, Malcolm Cacutalua –Football star (Erzgebirge Aue). Dayan Kodua und Khadra Sufi (TV-Stars)

Am 13 Oktober erwarten wir nicht nur interessante Gäste und Sprecher, sondern es wird auch eine Podiumsdiskussion stattfinden aus der auch Denkanstöße mit nach Hause genommen und weiterverfolgt werden können.

Wir freuen uns auf einen stimmungsvollen Abend mit der Community

Edward Martin
TopAfric e.V.

"Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today” And if you think education is expensive, try ignorance.

Why African Youth Education Project
Young migrants of African origin in Germany have low educational levels. A relatively large proportion of them rarely achieve the A level -/Abitur qualification. Besides, a large number of them do not continue their education after finishing junior secondary schools and some drop out completely which is very disturbing.

Another major problem is the lack of incentives to motivate these kids to pursue higher academic goals. It must however be noted that motivation is crucial for success in the educational system, It has not been possible for the German school system to compensate for these deficiencies in schools where children of African descent attend.

Children from African homes have significantly little or no motivation to learn as compared to children of German origin. One of the reasons is the lack of role models in the African communities. The consequences of these situations, among others, lead to the lack of integration and participation in the broader society.

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AYEA 2017 -Chamber of Commerce Hamburg

The goals of the AYE Project:
The aim of the project is to raise the educational and professional achievements of the youth of African origin as well as intensify the campaign and awareness on the significance of education for the social and professional integration of African youth in Germany. The project therefore seeks not to only motivate the African youth in Germany to study hard, but also to expose them and their parents to role models in the society through a network system.

Eligibility for Awards:
Africans who have successfully completed a vocation or finished learning a trade in Germany and all first year university students in Germany with African background are qualified to apply. Students and youth artisans can register at: www.ayeawards.de

We have presented awards to 54 students so far from 11 countries: Burkina Faso, Martinique, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Angola, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Namibia and Togo. The prestigious yearly program enjoys massive patronage by people of all walks of life.

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Latoya Spain, Angelina Akpovo & Sil Boyd -AYEA 2016

Venue -/Date:
AYEA has become a tradition and proud to be associated with the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce, which is founded in 1665 and has over 160.000 companies as its members.

 Since 2011 all the “African Youth Education Award” programs have been held at Albert-Schäfer-Saal, “IHK”, Adolphsplatz 1, 20457 Hamburg. The date for this year´s program is Saturday, 13th of October 2018. The program begins at 18.00 and ends at 21.00 Hrs.

Patrons till date:
The program is blessed with the under listed patrons: Ghana’s former Ambassador to Germany-His Excellency Mr. Paul King Aryene, Stephan Bührich-Honorary consul of Ghana –Hamburg, Associate Prof. Benjamin Armah (Director of Dr. Armah Biomedicals), Bettina Rhensius-Krohn-Honorary consul of Mali –Hamburg, Gerald Asamoah -Ex-Footballer and Otto Addo -Football Trainer.

Falko Drossmann
 Falko Drossmann -District Mayor of Hamburg-Mitte

Endorsements:
The program has been highly endorsed by Her Excellency Clémentine Shakembo Kamanga-Ambassador of the Democratic Republic of Congo,  His Excellency Paul King Aryene and H.E Akua Sena Dansua former Ambassadors of Ghana to Germany, Her Excellency Ba Hawa Keita-Ambassador of the Republic of Mali, Patrick Okoye-acting Nigerian Ambassador to Germany, Johnny Muthahi MUHINDO- deputy Ambassador of Uganda,  Dwamena Yeboah- Deputy Ambassador of Ghana who have all at one appoint in time attended the event.

Also, Minister M.O. Ajala-Nigeria Embassy Berlin, Minister George De Souza-Ghana Embassy Berlin, Minister Sitwala Mapenzi-Namibia Embassy Berlin, Mr Imran Simmins- first Secretary Political-South Africa, Minister Connie R. Nuwagaba of Uganda Embassy Berlin, Minister Maloto Alidah Mpeta-Lesotho Embasssy Berlin, Minister Adotey Anum,  Kwadwo Addo and Michael Asibi of Ghana Embassy Berlin and many high ranking diplomats from other African countries have attended the yearly event.

Participation by Politicians and Government officials:
Political representatives and other Government protocols have always been in contact with the program; among them are : Aydan Özoğuz (SPD) Minister responsible for Migration, Refugees and Integration, Ex. Bildungssenator Dietrich Wersich (CDU), Ties Rabe (SPD) Hamburg Bildungssenator, Rüdiger Kruse (CDU)Member of Parliament -Berlin, Johannes Kahrs (SPD) Member of Parliament –Berlin, Dr. Karamba Diaby (Member of Parliament –Berlin), Jürgen Klimke, Member of Parliament –Berlin, Jens Kerstan (Grüne) Hamburg Minister responsible for Energy and Environment, Falko Drossmann (SPD) District Mayor -Hamburg-Mitte, Jan Pörksen (SPD and Deputy Minister) Behörde für Arbeit, Soziales, Familie und Integration, Kofi Magnus -Member of Parliament-Ghana, Elombo Bolayela (SPD) Member of Parliament-Bremen, Jens P. Meyer(FDP) Member of Parliament –Hamburg, Aminata Touré Member of Parliament -Schleswig-Holstein,  Adeyemi Ademuyiwa –SPD, Mary Porch Oduro –CDU, Mr. Klaus Lube (SPD), Mrs Irene Appiah (SPD) Mr. Huy-Tam Van and Mr. Clement Klutse both of CDU, Sylvaina Gerlich and Frank Heinrich, directors of (IMIC e.v.).

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 Hon Betinna Rhensius-Krohn Consul of Mali in Hamburg &  Beate GröblinghoffCentral Office for VET
International

Support from Consulates:
The program is generously supported by a section of African consulates in Germany like

Hon. Consul. Stephan Burich -Ghana, Hon. Consul. Rheinsius-Krohn -Mali, Hon. Consul. Dr. Hans-J. Tesmer -Senegal, Hon. Consul Dr. Jens Peter Breitengroß-Kenya, Hon. Consul, Andreas Manfred Rohardt -Niger, Hon Consul Prof. Dr. Manfred Dietrich-Uganda and Hon. Consul Petra Hammelmann-Tanzania

Academicians:
The following academicians are connected with the program: Prof. Awudu Abdulai- University of Kiel, Prof. Dr. med Kofi De Heer, Associate Prof. Dr. Benjamin Armah, Dr. Uwe Heinrichs-Ministry of Education (Schulbehörde) Hamburg, Dr. Getie Galaye-University of Hamburg, Prof. Dr Marylyn Addo, Dr. de Lorent of Ministry of Education Hamburg, Dr Med. Victoria Manu, Dr Med. Kingsley Ohene Dokyi, Dr Frank Kwaw Codjoe, Dr Aissa Halidou, Dr Ramani Enusa, Dr Isaac Berbiye, Dr. med Yvonne K Uwamahoro, Dr. Koffi Lolo, Dr. Mohammed Khalifa, Dr. Aissa Halidou. Mrs. Gloria Boateng and  Mr Alex Kofi Appiah (Essen).

Major sponsors:
A successful program requires major support in cash and kind and we are proud to have such sponsors who support us yearly. Our profound gratitude shall always go to our major sponsors, particularly Dr. Armah –LAVOLTA, Hamburg Chamber of Commerce, Consulate of Mali, Consulate of Ghana, Hamburg district of Mitte, Hamburg district of Wandsbek and Akwaaba Travels.

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  AYEA 2017 Group photo   -Students, Elombo Bolayela, Aminata Toure, Klaus Luebke & Dayan Kodua

Individuals Donors

Personal donations from individuals in the African community has been a buffer for the success of the program and we deem it important to extend gratitude to Teddy Danso, Adeyemi Ademuyiwa, Joe Degraft –Ghana Cargo, Dipl.-Ing. Arch. Silkata A. Şahin-Adu s-Plan and Dipl.-Ing. Ohenenana Bonsu -Ayacsa. Jemima Asante, David Magezi, Alagi Darboe , Armando Camara, Hayford A Anyidoho, Christine Uwase, Eric Tuffour, Mrs Sabine Werner and Nana Acheampong for the support they give the program.

Special assistance from Africa community groups and associations:

As a program that brings African descents in Germany together to uplift and support the youth for their achievements, Community leaders and religious leaders like Pastors, Imams, Chiefs and Queen mothers and respected opinion leaders from the Nigeria, Mali, Niger, Ghana, Togo, Burkina Faso Kenya, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Benin and Sierra Leone communities in Germany always stood behind to see the success of the program and progress of the youth and we are encouraged by their participation.

Students and Youth leaders:
As the programs focus is on the youth; it is required to have second and third generation of African youngsters in Germany to help ensure sustainability and impact of the project for the core beneficiaries. By having more youth participating in organising the program, an exit of the older team will not lead to extinction but rather a dawn of fresh and energetic minds as successors.

Criticisms and Challenges:
Many have questioned the criteria  used in selecting the award winners- they are perfectly right. For now the emphasis is laid on the educational campaign to get more youth to learn trade as well as climb the academic ladder to become professionals contributing to the economic and social development of the society. The selection criteria will change when we see 1000s of African children entering into the Universities and vocational institutes. For now the numbers are not encouraging so we will keep celebrating the achievements of the few making it to Universities and vocational institutes.

Financial challenges:
Raising the needed funds to execute the program to its fullest has remained a great obstacle. As organizers, we are however determined to keep pushing this transformational program for the society.
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How does the funding help the students and the project:

Education is a never ending process. The aim is not only encouraging African youths to enrol in higher education but to as well as stay throughout the entire course and succeed.

Simply awarding the youth is not enough to keep them in school. We sincerely ask everybody to come forward and help fund this noble cause. By funding the program, we are able to accomplish the following:

  • · Keep track of each enrolled students’ progress in school
  • · Tackle any difficulties that might be hindering them from attending or finishing school
  • · Communicate with them on an individual basis so as to encourage them
  • · Help them to make the right decisions as to what they truly want to study
  • · Keep records of all enrolled African descent students in the higher education system in Germany
  • · Help them with petty cash issues
  • · Helping them with difficult classes/courses by appointing knowledgeable tutors and mentors
  • · Create recreational activities (such as sports, arts, dancing, singing, music etc) for all the students to ease stress from school activities.
  • · Most importantly we connect the students with community leaders, political leaders, religious leaders, and their educational mentors so that they can have a one on one face to face meeting for advice and mentorship.

Above is the image of the victim in a yellow Lacost t-shirt and khaki pants, involved in the recent shooting incidence that happened this month in Hamburg .The incidence caused a stire and rage among the African community in the Diaspora. The community organised a protest march against the German police, demanding the whereabout and welfare of the victim.

The 34 year old victim, Augustine Akwasi Obang hails from the Ashanti Region of Ghana. He is currently receiving medical attention at the ASKLEPIOS KLINIKUM ST.GEORG (Hospital)  Lohlmühlenstraße 5, Haus C, in Hamburg Germany.
The acting Ambassador of Ghana to Germany, Mr Samuel Adotey Anum took keen interest in the case right from day one. On Wednesday, the 15th of February 2017, at exactly 14:21 Mr Anum, his assistant and two reporters of Topafric Media Network, namely Effiya and Henock visited the ASKLEPIOS KLINIKUM ST.GEORG in Hamburg.

Upon arrival at the hospital,  the name AUGUSTINE AKWASI OBENG was no where to be found on the hospital's data. The lady at the reception made it clear, if his name was not on the computer then he is not in the hospital. 
Unfortunately the name is AUGUSTINE AKWASI OBANG and not AUGUSTINE AKWASI OBENG. 
The hospital receptionist demanded an identity card from the acting Ambassador before permitting him to see the victim. Security was very tight, with two security officers guiding the entrance

After about 45 minutes, Mr. Anum come out confirming Augustine is in good health and of sound mind and was even happy to see him. He said both had a normal conversatiom from the onset until he asked the victim to share his own side of the story.
According to the acting ambassador, his worry was why the two policemen and a handcuff on his right leg to the bed. He however adviced that it was better to withhold the victim's own side of the story until investigations are thouroughly conducted.
He again pleaded with the community leadership to allow the lawyer of the victim to legally handle the case while they patiently wait for the outcome.

EFFIYA AGYEIWAAH

A Liberian womans Video went viral on social media as she talked about how Men simpy love women who wear fake hair, fake eye lashes, fake lips,  and fake backsides.


She claims that whenever she walks down the street with her natural hair and no make up, Men do not approach her.


They prefer to approach women with fake hair, lipstick, fake eye lashes, fake butt and fake breast. She said that it is no surprise that such women have little to no good characters in them but yet those are the ones men are attracted towards.


She implied that most men simply look at a woman’s fake look rather than looking deep into their characters and behaviour.
The video which has gone viral on facebook is now on YouTube.

Following several complaints about the time schedule of your favorite advertising and entertaining platform "WEEKEND VYBEZ", the time has been changed with effect from today, Saturday, the 25th of March 2017. The program is hosted by one of Germany's prolific radio voices, Effiya and co-host Hennoch on Radio TopAfric Germany. The show has captivated a massive audience who crave for a more convenient time so they could really enjoy the program.http://topafric.radio.de

The program which previously aired every Sunday 20:00 - 22:00Hrs (CET), will from now air every Saturday.

WINTER TIME 

18:00 - 20:00Hrs (CET)
17:00 - 19:00Hrs (UK & GHANA) 
13:00 - 15:00Hrs (USA)

18:00 - 20:00Hrs (S A)

SUMMER TIME
18:00 - 20:00Hrs (CET)
16:00 - 18:00Hrs (UK & GHANA)

13:00 - 15:00Hrs(USA)
18:00 - 20:00Hrs (S A) 

Don't miss today's program as it promised to bring you intriguing interviews, thought provoking topics, fun, gist, news update on Germany, beyond and many more, that will brighten up your Saturdays every weekend. Do visit our website www.topafric.com for more news update on German. Also like our Facebook page, twitter, Instagram and snapchat and keep yourself informed, wherever you are.

Weekend Vybez! http://topafric.radio.de
Bringing you vybez as we vybe!

Don't Miss It!

EFFIYA EPHYA 

Max Afroshops

Just like human beings, businesses also have life cycles. If the business is not well taken care of, it can wither and die. Then memories will be the only thing left for those who cherished it.The Afro Businesses in Germany were given birth to years ago and some have flourished greatly while most are currently in crisis.

Unfortunately medical doctors cannot treat them of this particular illness since the businesses do not have blood vessels or veins to absorb medications. Afro Businesses remain venues for fellow Africans to meet and also serve as a place to get information both formal and informal.

Where will Africans put birthday party posters, marriage celebration posters, funeral announcement posters, and other event posters when all the Afro Businesses die off?

The earlier something is done the better!
African customers are very tight with their money hence find it difficult to buy merchandise from Afro businesses. They argue that the prices from the Afro businesses are too high. They want bargain prices as it is done in the Open market in Markola Market in Accra, Asigame Market in Lome, and Oshodi Market in Lagos-Nigeria.

When a single Afro business dies off, the effect is not just on the owner and the immediate family but the community as a whole. This is loss of business income, job and internship opportunities for our kids.

Unfortunately, competitors and fellow brethren jubilate over such closures. We remain the only folks who don’t get it!

Is it too late to revive the Afro Businesses? The traditional model of doing Businesses which is mostly done by one man who becomes jack of all trade and master of none has changed! To save our afro Businesses there is the need for quick deliberations and efforts.

Getting the product or produce from Africa will be cheaper when the owners of Afro Businesses have a central body that imports on their behalf than individual Businesses doing the import by themselves. Merging to own bigger shops will cut the cost of so many smaller shops that spread all over the place.

That said and done a plantain farmer in Kumasi-Ghana knows his produce will not go to waste and will be motivated to go into it on a larger scale, the maize farmer in Atakpame-Togo is assured of ready market as well. This would absolutely! Make more sense!

There is so much complain about our businesses and the solutions are at our finger tips but we see them to be so far away… Yes! We can save the Afro Businesses when we re-think the way we go about them as the music has changed and we need to change our dancing moves.

30 years ago ownership of Wholesales & Retails was pegged at 100%, 20 years then after it was 20% wholesales and 50% retail (Afro-Shops). Must we predict what happens in 20 years!

The most immediate option available to save the afro Businesses is to get an external consultant to help by bringing the business owners and key stakeholders of the African Community to effectively discuss and agree on plans that will be put in practice to revive the Businesses.

We can’t continue doing the same things and expect different results!

God Bless Africa
God Bless Germany

TopAfric Media Network

President Nana Addo Dankwa Akuffo Addo will be meeting the Ghana Community on Sunday, the 11th of June 2017 as part of his official visit to Germany. The meeting will take place at the Maritim Hotel in Berlin, Stauffenbergstraße 26, 10785 Berlin.

Participants are requested to register  at the HOTEL between 14.30 –15.30. The event will start from 16.00 until 17.00. While visiting Germany, President Akufo-Addo will be calling on the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, and participate in the G-20 Africa Partnership Summit, to be held in Berlin to deliberate on Germany’s “Marshall Plan” for Africa, at the invitation of the German Chancellor.

The president will be meeting German business associates to enable him market the vast business potentials of the country to them. He would also deliver a speech on the theme “Ghana, Africa’s Rising Star”, at an event organised by the Konrad Adenaeur Stiftung.

The president will be expected to inform the Ghanaian community about his government’s plans for the country, and his commitment to implement all policies and programs promised to the people of Ghana.

The President will be accompanied by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Shirley Ayorkor Botchway, Dr. Matthew Opoku Prempeh –Minister of Education and officials of the Presidency and Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
TopAfric Media Network

In this internet world, dating is already a hard enough ballgame with the complete takeover of online dating, new ideals of perfection, and the near disappearance of chivalry. Adding to the list of shitty things, but not new to the dating culture, is the act of cheating.


Cheating in itself is already a horrifying experience if you’re the one whose trust was betrayed but when you’re the side chick that didn’t know the person you fell for was committed; the feelings of being cheated are equally as hurtful. A lot of people hate on the side chick or pass blame on to them, but sometimes they’re just as clueless as the partner that got cheated on. These are the painful stages of finding out you’re the woman on the side.1. The force of being blindsided.
The initial shock factor of finding out that the object of your affection has another object to his is like having the wind knocked out of you unexpectedly with a silent violence on your emotions. It destroys every daydream you ever had for a future that never existed.

2. Wondering what vibe you gave off that caused you to be chosen
You start to wonder what it was about you that made you the perfect target to play stand in to their relationship. Were you just in the wrong place at the wrong time, or did he read into you as someone who would play along in his game of charades?

3. Feeling unworthy and full of self-doubt. 
What does she have that I don’t? You wonder why you’ve finally found someone you loved spending time with, but he already had someone else before you. You wonder if you had just met him first, things might be different… but they wouldn’t, because he would likely have done the same thing to you eventually.

4. Realizing your trust was broken, too. 
You thought he was faithful to you, but the reality is he was unfaithful to her, and that’s a trust he broke between you two, as well.

5. Contemplating whether you should tell the main chick, if she doesn’t already know. 
This is when anger starts to penetrate you. You feel guilt over being put in this situation and you feel like the way to be in control again is to come out with the truth. You’ll live in this place for a while, wrestling with if you should or shouldn’t say anything, which only digs into your own pain more.

6. Feeling guilty for no reason. You feel so guilty, like you’re the one in the wrong.
You know you’ll be seen as the villain for being the one he played with, so you self loathe and blame yourself for a while. You need to remember that this isn’t your fault, and you didn’t ask for this.

7. Realizing the signs you didn’t realize were signs. 
That time he stepped out of the room to make a phone call, or how you never met any of his friends and kept dates low key were all signs. Those weren’t work calls. It wasn’t that he was busy because he was working late; he was busy because he was going home to his real relationship.

8. Experiencing incredible amounts of sympathy. 
You start to reflect on the horror of the situation in its entirety, including the other person he betrayed, and you feel sorry for her as well. You realize you’re both victims in this situation and the pain you’re feeling is shared.

9. Reaching inevitable defeat and acceptance.
Once the damage sinks in, and you reflect on everything you just went through, you realize you’ve been played and even though you got hurt and you didn’t find the right guy, you weeded out a master sh*t head before it was too late. Sure, it’s going to hurt for a while, but at least you’re no longer wasting time with someone who doesn’t truly appreciate or deserve you. You just know better for next time you gamble your heart.

Source: http://www.bolde.com/9-painful-stages-finding-youre-side-chick/

On friday, June 30th, 2017, The parliament in Germany voted to legalise same-sex marriage after Chancellor Angela Merkel bowed to pressure and dropped her longstanding disapproval. Africans react to the same sex marriage Law by giving their unbiased opinion.


With the passage of the bill, Germany would now join many other European countries in extending full marital rights to same-sex couples, including the right to adopt children. Such rights had only been limited to civil partnerships since 2001 without full marriage status and the ability to adopt children.

But what does such a vote mean for many young Africans in Germany whose legislations back home are still very hostile towards homosexuality? Punishment for engaging in same-sex relationships in countries like Nigeria and Uganda range from 10 years to life imprisonment.

Nigerian scholars are asked in this second episode of the L.O.L Show (Lens of Leadership) on TopAfric about their opinions on the social norm and whether or not they would advocate such legislation back home.


Watch the video below to get their opinions and reactions.

There is hardly anything that contributes to a better mood or offers more fun than one of the most beautiful pastimes in the world. But the importance of a healthy and regular sex life really is often underestimated.

Here are eight good reasons why you should not neglect your sex life. Because this is what happens to your body when you stop having sex:
Why a healthy sex life not only ensures a good mood

1. You get sick more often

If you don’t have sex for a long time, your immune system becomes significantly weaker. Germs then have an easier job of spreading in your body and you can catch a cold or get the flu more easily. So, just by having more sex, you can help keep your herbal remedy teas in the closet!

2. Your stress levels increase

Sex is a great way to reduce your stress levels. Regular sex reduces the amount of stress hormones and makes you feel more relaxed in everyday life. Without this important balance, you could become a ticking time bomb!

3. It’s harder for you to get aroused

It’s hard to believe, but true: If you don’t regularly “practice,” it’s difficult for a lot of people to become aroused. Men can experience problems having erections and it can be harder for women to have an orgasm. So, you have to stay on top of things to make sure the “switch” always remains on.

4. Your dreams change
Some people suddenly notice that they have strange dreams when their sex life is suffering. It can mean that you unexpectedly start dreaming about sex or have orgasms in your sleep.

5. Over time you lose your desire to have sex

If your body notices that you’re having a prolonged dry spell in the sexual sense, the production of sex hormones reduces. You feel less like having sex if you have been abstinent for a while. In addition, your libido will eventually feel different. And this is all due to the fact that your sex hormones are slowly vanishing.

6. You’ll feel more distance between your partner and yourself

When a couple in a relationship only rarely sleep together, their interpersonal distance becomes greater. You may start to have feelings of uncertainty related to your partner and other people will seem more attractive to you.

7. It lowers your feeling of self-worth

It is not surprising that a person’s self-worth is harmed, if that individual does not regularly feel desired. But a lack of sex has been proven to affect a person’s well-being, leading to sadness or depression when sex is absent from their lives. Studies have shown that having sex regularly helps fight depression. It can sometimes even work as well as antidepressants.

8. Your risk of cancer increases

For men, the risk of prostate cancer increases when they don’t have sex for a longer period of time. So it’s not a bad idea for men to “flush out” the pipes. Because then the risk is significantly reduced.

Well, if all this isn’t motivation enough, then I don’t know what is! For all these reasons, it would be almost irresponsible not to make love more regularly, don’t you think?!

Source: hefty.com

Obesity is a growing problem within the African/Black community in Germany and Europe at Large.
With foods such as Fufu, Rice, Yam, Plantains as the staple unit, it makes it easy for Africans to gain weight so easily.

Akoto Degross was an obese individual who lived in Hamburg, Germany for a while where he was attending University and it was during this period that he decided to make a drastic change in his obese life by loosing half his body weight.

He had tried numerous times to loose weight but not until he lost his mother did he buckle up and strictly jump into loosing weight and living a healthier lifestyle.

In the video below, he discusses different reasons why Africans in the diaspora are over weight. He explained what they are doing wrong and how they can change and live better and healthier lives.

He also stated that the obesity epidemic is primarily rampant among the African Women in the diaspora.

He is an author and certified weight loss expert and runs a program called fat2fitghana (http://fat2fitghana.com/) which helps alot of people loose weight and live a healthier life style.

He has also written 2 books on how to loose weight.


1. 7 Simple steps to losing weight (http://amzn.to/2xcz8Wr)
2. Change what you eat Change how you look 
..Click this link to read it (http://amzn.to/2wKIHc7)

Hamburger Sparkasse (HASPA) a prominent bank situated in Hamburg, Germany, donated the sum of 2.000 € (Two thousand euros) to IMIC e.V on the 14th of November 2013.

The donation from Haspa was given to Mrs. Sylvaina Gerlich, Chairlady of IMIC, by Mr. Andreas Meyer during an award ceremony at the Walddörfer sports club. Mrs. Bettina Behrens, leader of the branch located at Bramfelder chaussee 493 was also present.

This donation originated from the lottery-savings Sparkasse customers. Customers can win up to 50.000€ with a 1,00€ input every month. The lottery costs five euros and four euros gets saved from there. 25cents is donated to a good non-profit organizations such as Brakula, Freiwilligenboerse, and IMIC.

With 2,5million euros collected, over 100 non-profit organizations in Hamburg benefit from this lottery system every year. Each organization is recommended by a Haspa branch.

Topafric

The number of qualified professionals in Germany from countries such as India and China is on the rise, according to a media report published on Tuesday. The Rheinische Post (RP) states in its report that about one in four specialists (22.8 percent) who come to Germany with the EU Blue Card are from India, followed by people from China, Russia, Ukraine and Syria.

At the end of 2016, 97,865 Indians were living in Germany, according to the Central Register of Foreigners (AZR). This figure was drastically lower nearly a decade ago; the number of Indians in Germany was only 42,495 in 2007.

READ ALSO: The five most common challenges Indians face in Germany

Since the EU Blue Card - a residence permit issued by an EU member state to professionals from non-EU/EEA countries - was introduced in 2013, the number of cards issued as work permits in Germany to people from various countries has steadily been on the increase.

In the first half of 2017 alone 11,023 cards were issued across the Bundesrepublik, RP reports, referencing data from the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF).

In 2016, this figure was 17,362 - an significant increase from a total of 11,290 cards handed out in 2013.

In order to be issued with a card, a person needs to fill two prerequisites: possession of a university degree and evidence of a binding job offer with an annual salary of at least €49,600. In the fields of mathematics, IT, natural sciences, medicine or engineering, one’s salary must be at least €38,888.

The card is initially valid for up to four years, but this can be extended. After 33 months of working in Germany, holders of an EU Blue Card can be granted a permanent settlement permit. Though this can be reduced to just 21 months with a B1 German language certificate.

 

Insects are high in protein and minerals, need far less feed per kilo of mass than cattle do and produce far less greenhouse gas per kilo than pigs. A United Nations food agency is pushing a new kind of diet for a hungry world. It ranks high in nutritional value and gets good grades for protecting the environment: edible insects.

The Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organization hailed the likes of grasshoppers, ants and other members of the insect world as an underutilised food for people, livestock and pets. A new report says two billion people worldwide already supplement their diets with insects. Insects are high in protein and minerals, need far less feed per kilo of mass than cattle do and produce far less greenhouse gas per kilo than pigs.

While most edible insects are gathered in forests, the UN says mechanisation can boost insect-farming production. Currently most insect farming serves niche markets such as China.

Mirror

 

The weekend of April 12th - 14th 2013, African Day was celebrated in a sub division called Hohenhorst, (a suburb in Hamburg, Germany) There were lots of activities for both parents and kids.  Among the activities was soccer competition for kids, art drawing, cooking and sale of artifacts.

The soccer game featured a mini-African cup competition which all the kids participated in and enormously enjoyed.  It showed them team spirit and everybody who played was a winner. A Hip Hop dance crew also performed during the half time soccer game. Deyon Martins further energized the crowd with his Afro-Pop music.  The kids were dancing and celebrating to his wonderful tunes.

The end of the Friday show featured a viewing of an African movie called No Time To Die.  Everybody who attended watched the film. The Saturday program started with a fashion show which featured clothes from different regions of Africa. The presenter, Elizabeth Boateng, described the clothes being displayed

Then there were opening speeches from actress, Dayan Kodu, and Irene Appiah, from the Board of Education in Hamburg.  After which was a short film called Uwe & Uwe. The Saturday show also featured West African drumming, Kora guitar playing by Saliou and the group Djante Bi. They presented spectacular dance choreograph/ music from Senegal, Gambia, Guinea Bissau and Guinea. The Djante Bi group consists of four drummers and six dancers from Ivory Coast, Senegal, Guinea, Togo, Ghana and Germany.  The audience was elated

 During the musical break, there was African food, Jewellery display, and snacks. 

The end of Saturday show saw DJ Arthur performing different beats such as Azonto, Highlife, Reggae and Afro beats.   Over all it was a wonderful and successful show.  The organizers deserve two thumbs up.

Article by Paulina and Maame

 

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There is hardly anything that contributes to a better mood or offers more fun than one of the most beautiful pastimes in the world. But the importance of a healthy and regular sex life really is often underestimated.

Here are eight good reasons why you should not neglect your sex life. Because this is what happens to your body when you stop having sex:
Why a healthy sex life not only ensures a good mood

1. You get sick more often

If you don’t have sex for a long time, your immune system becomes significantly weaker. Germs then have an easier job of spreading in your body and you can catch a cold or get the flu more easily. So, just by having more sex, you can help keep your herbal remedy teas in the closet!

2. Your stress levels increase

Sex is a great way to reduce your stress levels. Regular sex reduces the amount of stress hormones and makes you feel more relaxed in everyday life. Without this important balance, you could become a ticking time bomb!

3. It’s harder for you to get aroused

It’s hard to believe, but true: If you don’t regularly “practice,” it’s difficult for a lot of people to become aroused. Men can experience problems having erections and it can be harder for women to have an orgasm. So, you have to stay on top of things to make sure the “switch” always remains on.

4. Your dreams change
Some people suddenly notice that they have strange dreams when their sex life is suffering. It can mean that you unexpectedly start dreaming about sex or have orgasms in your sleep.

5. Over time you lose your desire to have sex

If your body notices that you’re having a prolonged dry spell in the sexual sense, the production of sex hormones reduces. You feel less like having sex if you have been abstinent for a while. In addition, your libido will eventually feel different. And this is all due to the fact that your sex hormones are slowly vanishing.

6. You’ll feel more distance between your partner and yourself

When a couple in a relationship only rarely sleep together, their interpersonal distance becomes greater. You may start to have feelings of uncertainty related to your partner and other people will seem more attractive to you.

7. It lowers your feeling of self-worth

It is not surprising that a person’s self-worth is harmed, if that individual does not regularly feel desired. But a lack of sex has been proven to affect a person’s well-being, leading to sadness or depression when sex is absent from their lives. Studies have shown that having sex regularly helps fight depression. It can sometimes even work as well as antidepressants.

8. Your risk of cancer increases

For men, the risk of prostate cancer increases when they don’t have sex for a longer period of time. So it’s not a bad idea for men to “flush out” the pipes. Because then the risk is significantly reduced.

Well, if all this isn’t motivation enough, then I don’t know what is! For all these reasons, it would be almost irresponsible not to make love more regularly, don’t you think?!

Source: hefty.com

On that faithful Saturday, I was the barbecue master for the youth party and had no choice than to listen to their kind of music. I usually listen to lyrics of the legend Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Burning Spear, Lucky Dube, I Jah Man and many others, yes strictly roots reggae. So papa why are you listening to Shatte Wale’s “AYOO”, asked the little kids. You always condemn and label this music as noise. The truth is that I have never taken the time to listen or play it.

The music was played repeatedly, honestly I had no choice than to pay attention and sing along. While the kids were moved by the rhythm, I was touched by the message. The controversial musician started by saying something is about to happen to Ghana. “They are killing our future and nobody cares to say something” AYOO!!! Ghana is dipping into anarchy and nobody cares. “AYOO” literally translated from the EWE language “He who refuses to do the right thing today pays the price tomorrow”.

The controversial musician continued by saying anytime he voices out they say he is a bad boy. We see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil and feel no evil, provided they can fill their stomach. The country is sitting on a time bomb.

Ghanaians have mortgaged their country to the Chinese, their soldiers are guiding and protecting Chinese owned mining fields. Trust me the worst culprits are post independent graduates, their appetite for quick wealth is unquenchable and unimaginable.  

Youth-Unemployment
Unemployment state in the country is undesirable, there are no strategic plans in place to address the issue neither do we have any meaningful data in place to begin with. The education system is not helping either, we continue producing white color seeking graduates year after year. Technical and vocational institutions have been relegated to the background, while we setup new universities every year. You should be lucky to know someone who knows you, to fix you somewhere. Good grades matter less, connections matter most.

Yes, the universities are big businesses, unfortunately not tailored to suit the needs of the country nor the job markets. My American friend will say“discombobulated”.

But then why not produce high in demand graduates for export. When care is not taken a day will come when these young frustrated talents will take the law into their own hands. Shatte Wale kept saying people are afraid to voice out their opinion for fear of intimidation and isolation, but that day is coming when we shall say “AYOO”

Security
The country’s deteriorating security challenges is another unattended issue, armed robbery is the other of the day, the rich have built huge security fences along their homes, lacking fresh air and suffocating in their barricade homes. The gangsters no longer bother jumping the walls, they wait outside for them. The country is close to becoming lawless, rural folks having the guts to kill security officers all in search of survival. If care is not taken a time will come when people will be snatched from moving cars. A starving man is an angry man. The question one may ask is the society gradually deteriorating into anarchy?

Food-Security
One may say in the abundance of plenty, the visionless is wanting, almost every farming land in Ghana can be cultivated all year, nevertheless the people have to import onions and tomatoes from neighboring countries . Soon they will start importing not only rice but plantain and cassava from China. Food production has been on the decline for decades and it seems there are no measures in place to curve the situation. Meanwhile Ghanaians have Farmers Day which goes with a National Holiday, Shatte Wale may ask “What are they celebrating”

Galamsey
Galamsey has been part of Ghanaian system for decades, why has it become that topical today? Yes it is destroying the water bodies, farming lands are not only been destroyed but infected with chemicals thus making harvested crops poisonous. The rural dwellers were long into Galamsey, but the impact was not that devastating until the “Accra Pen and Paper” gentlemen with their multinationals pals decided to have their fair share. They always want it big and if possible all for themselves. They came in with heavy equipment’s. What took the local boys to a century, it took them days to destroy.

The question is how long shall we be led by our stomach… we don’t care what happens to the unborn. Nobody cares about the bad roads, all we care about is driving fancy cars on them, nobody cares about bad health system, we are more concerned about affording it outside the country, nobody cares how you become rich, all we care about is having our share of the money. We have lost it all, no cultural lineage.

Until we accept we are engulfed in greed, and that we sinking very fast, we will not be able to save ourselves from this grave. Shatte Wale will continue to sing loud “AYOO” Have we become a people without direction? What legacy are we leaving for the unborn, create, loot and share? We have ceased to speak our mind, be constructive and objective citizens.

Leadership
We have ourselves to blame, we have succeeded installing Followers as Leaders, and then turn around to question their inability. People who need to be directed are in charge and steering affairs and leading us no where and nobody cares. AYOO!

Desmond John Beddy -/TopAfric Media Network

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